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Lincoln documents found in world's oldest republic

Images obtained by Papers of Abraham Lincoln include 1861 letter granting San Marino citizenship to Lincoln

December 9, 2013

SPRINGFIELD – Even the world’s oldest and smallest republic shares in Abraham Lincoln’s legacy. Two Lincoln-related documents – including one granting citizenship to the new president – have been found in the Republic of San Marino.

Images of the 1861 letters have been added to the collection of the Papers of Abraham Lincoln, a project dedicated to tracking down all documents to and from America’s 16th president.

The first of the two letters was sent to Lincoln by San Marino’s Regent Captains, the nation’s joint heads of state. In English and Italian, they said that as a “mark of high consideration and sincere fraternity” for the United States, citizenship in the Republic of San Marino had been conferred on Lincoln. They also acknowledged America’s “political griefs” and prayed that God would “grant you a peaceful solution.”

In his response dated May 7, 1861, Lincoln thanked the Council of San Marino “for the honor of citizenship” and assured them that “although your dominion is small, your State is nevertheless one of the most honored in all history.” He explained that the Civil War “involves the question whether a Representative republic, extended and aggrandized so much as to be safe against foreign enemies, can save itself from the dangers of domestic faction.”

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Grant will help safeguard images of Lincoln papers

Papers of Abraham Lincoln receives ‘AWS in Education Grant’ to store images in secure environment

September 3, 2013

SPRINGFIELD – The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum announced today that Amazon Web Services has awarded the Papers of Abraham Lincoln an “AWS in Education Grant” of $24,000 in storage services. This will allow the Papers of Abraham Lincoln to store more than 35 terabytes of master image files in a secure environment.

For the past decade, the staff of the Papers of Abraham Lincoln has been collecting images of documents written by or to Abraham Lincoln from repositories and private collections around the world. The project has scanned more than 90,000 documents from more than 400 repositories and 180 private collections in 47 states and 5 foreign countries thus far. The archive will likely top 150,000 documents when complete.

From 2006 to 2013, the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign housed the growing archive of master image files. The retirement of their Mass Storage System has forced the project to look for a new storage solution for its 35 terabytes of files. (Thirty-five terabytes is roughly equivalent to a digital music file that would play non-stop for 68 years, or to 10.8 million photographs.)

Read more: Grant will help safeguard images of Lincoln papers

New Abraham Lincoln document found in Switzerland

Letter from clergyman recommends female journalist who ended up covering the Lincoln White House

July 23, 2013Beecher to Lincoln 1

SPRINGFIELD –The Papers of Abraham Lincoln, a research project based at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Springfield, has identified a previously unknown Lincoln document in Switzerland. The document is a letter of introduction for a female journalist written by famous clergyman Henry Ward Beecher and includes a note from the president at the bottom.

The document came to light as a result of global contacts made by the Papers of Abraham Lincoln during its search for any document written by or to the 16th president. One of those contacts, Tim Verhoeven, a Lecturer at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, remembered seeing what he thought was a Lincoln document while doing research in Switzerland. He sent a digital image to the experts in Springfield, who then contacted the Bibliothèque de Genève. The Papers of Abraham Lincoln was able to confirm the two-page letter as a previously unknown Lincoln document. 

Read more: New Abraham Lincoln document found in Switzerland

UIS receives gift for Papers of Abraham Lincoln

February 28, 2013

SPRINGFIELD – A gift of $25,000 will aid the Papers of Abraham Lincoln in continuing its search for Lincoln documents at the National Archives.  Since 2006, researchers for the Papers of Abraham Lincoln have been searching for documents written by or to Abraham Lincoln in the vast holdings of the National Archives, both at its familiar facility on Pennsylvania Avenue in downtown Washington, and at its newer facility in College Park, Maryland.  Thus far, they have identified more than 56,000 documents within the project’s scope, including scores of new documents and hundreds of brief notes written by Lincoln.

This generous gift, made possible through the efforts of Benjamin Shapell and the Shapell Family Foundation, will aid the project in replacing funding that has supported the research at the National Archives since 2008.  For the past five years, the Shelby Cullom Davis Charitable Fund has supported a team of professional researchers for the Papers of Abraham Lincoln at the National Archives.  The Davis Charitable Fund completes its five-year commitment in the summer of 2013, and the Papers of Abraham Lincoln needs to attract approximately $325,000 per year to continue the search for documents.

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Papers of Abraham Lincoln digitally reunites Lincoln letter and envelope

Letter at Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library matched to envelope in private collection in Australia

Lincoln to Magoffin

December 20, 2012

SPRINGFIELD – The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library had a letter but no envelope. An Australian collector had an envelope but no letter. Now the two items have been reunited, digitally.

As part of its global effort to locate Lincoln documents, the Papers of Abraham Lincoln project has matched the envelope to the letter it once held. The originals remain 9,500 miles apart, but digital images of both will now be available to scholars and to the public.

The director of the Papers of Abraham Lincoln, Daniel W. Stowell, received several leads on potential Lincoln documents in Australian repositories and private collections during a trip there in July. One of those leads was to Dr. Barry O. Jones, an Australian writer and politician who has had a fascinating career.

 

Read more: Papers of Abraham Lincoln digitally reunites Lincoln letter and envelope